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ANTONIO: In sooth, I know not why I … My Lord Bassanio, since you have found Antonio, We two will leave you. Salarino. Your mind is tossing on the ocean; But I should think of shallows and of flats. Act 1, Scene 1: Venice.A street. English Maths Physics Chemistry Biology. The Warehouse Theatre 34,084 views His reasons are as two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff; you shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you have them, they are not worth the search. The Merchant of Venice : Act 1, Scene 1 Thou know’st that all my fortunes are at sea. My Lord Bassanio, since you have found Antonio, We two will leave you, but at dinner-time. Not in love neither? My ventures are not in one bottom trusted. Do you have questions or feedback for the Folger Shakespeare team? Please consider making a small donation to help keep this site free. Check if you have access via personal or institutional login. But how I caught it, found it, or came by it. Plucking the grass to know where sits the wind. Portia enters as a doctor of…, Gratiano gives the disguised Portia Bassanio’s ring. Than my heart cool with mortifying groans. Tap to unmute. I would have stay’d till I had made you merry. I’ll tell thee more of this another time. I must be one of these same dumb wise men. Main (202) 544-4600Box Office (202) 544-7077. A summary of Part X (Section2) in William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. But how I caught it, found it, or came by it, What stuff ’tis made of, whereof it is … His friends Salerio and Solanio plan to cheer him up by telling him that he’s only worried about his ships returning safely to port. All's Well That Ends Well Antony & Cleopatra As You Like It Comedy of Errors Coriolanus Cymbeline Double Falsehood Edward 3 Hamlet Henry 4.1 Henry 4.2 Henry 5 Henry 6.1 Henry 6.2 Henry 6.3 Henry 8 Julius Caesar King John King Lear King Richard 2 Love's Labour's Lost Macbeth Measure for Measure Merchant of Venice Merry Wives of Windsor Midsummer Night's Dream Much Ado About Nothing … But he does not know the reason of his sadness. But Shylock insists that the…, Portia entrusts the management of her household to Lorenzo and pretends to leave with Nerissa for a house of an…. Jessica praises Portia and jokes with Lorenzo. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. Believe me, no. As soon as Lorenzo arrives, he calls Jessica, who throws him…, At Belmont the Prince of Morocco attempts to choose the right chest and win Portia. I pray you, good Bassanio, let me know it; And if it stand, as you yourself still do. Nor is the wide world ignorant of her worth, For the four winds blow in from every coast. I urge this childhood proof. Believe me, sir, had I such venture forth, Be with my hopes abroad. His good friend Bassanio joins him. Nature hath fram’d strange fellows in her time: Some that will evermore peep through their eyes, That they’ll not show their teeth in way of smile. His friends Salerio and Solanio attempt to cheer him up by telling him that he is only worried about his ships returning safely to port. Fare you well! By something showing a more swelling port. Antonio, a Venetian merchant, has invested all his wealth in trading expeditions. Venice. Which makes her seat of Belmont Colchis’ strond. (Antonio; Salerio; Solanio; Bassanio; Lorenzo; Gratiano), Antonio cannot put a finger on exactly why he is so sad; none of his friends’ suggestions quite hit the mark and their attempts to cheer him up are unsuccessful. Three thousand ducats; well. Why should a man whose blood is warm within, Sleep when he wakes? He says that … In sooth, I know not why I am so sad: It wearies me; you say it wearies you; But how I … ICSE Solutions Selina ICSE Solutions ML Aggarwal Solutions. His reasons are as, two grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you, shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you. Sometimes from her eyes. Summary: Act I, scene i Antonio, a Venetian merchant, complains to his friends, Salarino and Solanio, that a sadness has overtaken him and dulled his faculties, although he is at a … The Merchant of Venice Act 1, Scene 1. Antonio (a Venetian merchant) is hanging out with his friends Salerio and Solanio on a street in Venice. I pray you have in mind where we must meet. Should I go to church. Salerio and Solanio think he is worried about his ships at sea, but he affirms that his investments are so diversified that he has no fear of loss, yet he is anxious still. And she is fair and, fairer than that word, Of wondrous virtues. Merchant of Venice: Act 1, Scene 3. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search within full text. Copy link. I should not see the sandy hourglass run, But I should think of shallows and of flats And see my wealthy Andrew docked in sand, Vailing her high top lower than her ribs 30 … Not in love neither? In Venice Bassanio goes to Shylock, a Jewish moneylender, to borrow, in Antonio’s name, 3,000 ducats. Original Text ICSE Solutions Selina ICSE Solutions ML Aggarwal Solutions. From such a noble rate. We come to know that the main story is about the love of Bassanio and Portia. SALARINO Shylock grudgingly accepts and commands Jessica to guard their house carefully…. Scene 1 of the Merchant of Venice is important because it is the expository scene. That in your knowledge may by me be done. Therefore go forth: That shall be racked even to the uttermost. Piring in maps for ports and piers and roads; What harm a wind too great might do at sea. And if it stand, as you yourself still do. Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. Now by two-headed Janus. Would scatter all her spices on the stream, And now worth nothing? Antonio: In sooth, I know not why I'm so sad : It wearies me; you say it wearies you; But how I caught it, found it, or came by it, What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born, I am to learn; Left alone, Bassanio explains to Antonio that to repair his squandered fortunes, he intends to win the hand of Portia, a wealthy heiress. What stuff ’tis made of, whereof it is born, There where your argosies with portly sail. Sometimes from her eyes. A stage where every man must play a part. And not bethink me straight of dangerous rocks, Which touching but my gentle vessel’s side. Fare you well. Fare ye well a while. For three months; well. Thou shalt not know the sound of thine own tongue. A street (Enter ANTONIO, SALARINO, and SALANIO) ANTONIO. Must it be so? Answer : Bassanio invites Shylock to have dinner with them but Shylock gets offended and says that he cannot dine with them as they eat pork, which is forbidden for Jews. My wind cooling my broth Would blow me to an ague when I thought 25 What harm a wind too great at sea might do. Then let us say you are sad, Because you are not merry; and ’twere as easy, For you to laugh and leap, and say you are merry. We’ll make our leisures to attend on yours. Here comes Bassanio, your most noble kinsman. SCENE. In my school-days, when I had lost one shaft, I shot his fellow of the self-same flight, The self-same way with more advised watch, To find the other forth, and by adventuring both. That such a thing bechanc’d would make me sad? Gratiano speaks an infinite deal of nothing, more than any man in all Venice. Merchant of Venice: Act 1, Scene 3 - Duration: 5:53. the merchant of venice | act 1 | scene 1 | mrc About Press Copyright Contact us Creators Advertise Developers Terms Privacy Policy & Safety How YouTube works Test new features © 2021 … I must be one of these same dumb wise men. Antonio, a wealthy merchant of Venice, made his riches through marine trade. A summary of Part X (Section2) in William Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice. With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come. A street. Enter Antonio, Salerio, and Solanio. Enter Antonio, Salarino, and Solanio. That such a thing bechanced would make me sad? Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable. To raise a present sum; therefore go forth. And thankfully rest debtor for the first. You have too much respect upon the world. ANTONIO. Read Act 1, Scene 1 of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, side-by-side with a translation into Modern English. In a…, Lorenzo, Gratiano, Solanio, and Salarino try to arrange a masque for Bassanio’s dinner that night. Say, when? Shopping. SALARINO. Plucking the grass to know where sits the wind. Gratiano and Salarino wait for Lorenzo near Shylock’s house. Venice. Which makes her seat of Belmont Colchos’ strond. I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano. ANTONIO 119 Well, tell me now what lady is the same 120 To whom you swore a secret pilgrimage, have them, they are not worth the search. With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come. (184 lines). The play, then, exposes the situation on which the story is built. Thanks, i’ faith, for silence is only commendable. The Merchant of Venice: Home Act 1 Act 2 Act 3 Act 4 Act 5 Literary Devices Mini Character Profiles Details Main Event. I owe you much, and, like a willful youth, That which I owe is lost. We’ll make our leisures to attend on yours. To furnish thee to Belmont to fair Portia. The opening line of the play reveals that Antonio, the merchant of Venice, is sad. He picks the gold one…, In Venice Solanio and Salarino discuss the latest news: Shylock’s torment over the loss of his daughter and the treasures…, At Belmont the Prince of Arragon attempts to win Portia by choosing the silver chest, but finds in it the…, In Venice Solanio and Salarino have learned that the Italian ship wrecked in the English Channel was Antonio’s. English Maths Physics Chemistry Biology. His reasons are as two 116 grains of wheat hid in two bushels of chaff: you 117 shall seek all day ere you find them, and when you 118 have them, they are not worth the search. I owe you much, and like a willful youth, That which I owe is lost, but if you please. And creep into the jaundies, By being peevish? You grow exceeding strange. (I love thee, and ’tis my love that speaks): And when I ope my lips, let no dog bark.”. In sooth, I know not why I am so sad: It wearies me; you say it wearies you; But how I caught it, found it, or came by it, What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born, 5. Hang on her temples like a golden fleece. Original Text Act I Scene I. But my chief care, Is to come fairly off from the great debts. Passage – 1 (Act I, Sc.I, Line 1-7) Paraphrase : Now, by two-headed. Try this amazing Merchant Of Venice Act 1 Scene 1 Quiz! His two friends leave after Bassanio, Graziano and Lorenzoarrive. -- Philip Weller, November 13, 1941 - February 1, 2021 Dr. Weller, an Eastern Washington University professor of English and Shakespearean scholar for more than 50 years. This page contains the original text of Act 1, Scene 1 of The Merchant of Venice. Hang on her temples like a golden fleece. Share. Merchant of Venice Act 1, Scene 1 Modern English Translation Meaning Annotations – ICSE Class 10 & 9 English. I take it your own business calls on you. Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time: Some that will evermore peep through their eyes, That they’ll not show their teeth in way of smile. Nerissa decides to try to obtain from Gratiano the ring that she had…, Portia and Nerissa return to Belmont. And thankfully rest debtor for the first. Enter ANTONIO, SALARINO, and SALANIO ANTONIO In sooth, I know not why I am so sad: It wearies me; you say it wearies you; But how I caught it, found it, or came by it, What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born, I am to learn; And such a want-wit sadness makes of me, That I have much ado to know myself. I’ll grow a talker for this gear. Enter ANTONIO, SALARINO, and SALANIO. You have too much respect upon the world. But if you please. Graziano and Lorenzo remark that Antonio does not look well before exiting, leaving Bassanio alone with Antonio. SCENE III. I would have stayed till I had made you merry. All Acts and Scenes are listed on the The Merchant of Venice text page, or linked to from the bottom of this page. Summary and Analysis Act I: Scene 1 Summary Walking along a street in Venice, Antonio (the "merchant" of the title) confesses to his friends Salarino and Salanio that lately he has felt unaccountably sad. Therefore my merchandise makes me not sad. You know me well, and herein spend but time, And out of doubt you do me now more wrong. In a neat’s tongue dried and a maid not vendible. Salerio proposes, with Solanio's agreement, that Antonio must be worried about his ships at sea. Lancelet brings Shylock an invitation to dinner at Bassanio’s. Which you did shoot the first, I do not doubt. Structured Questions from The Merchant of Venice Act 1 Scene 1 Reshmi 07 Dec, 2019 0 Comments Questions and Answers from The Merchant of Venice Act 1 Scene 1 by William Shakespeare Log in Register Recommend to librarian Print publication year: … You can buy the Arden text of this play from the Amazon.com online bookstore: The Merchant of Venice (Arden Shakespeare: Second Series) Entire play in one page. Act I, Scene One Antonio, a merchant, is during a melancholic state of mind and unable to seek out a reason for his depression. A street. My ventures are not in one bottom trusted. Antonio, however, denies that he’s worried about his ships and remains depressed. Bassanio, his friend and kinsman, asks him for money to go to Belmont, where Bassanio hopes to marry the heiress Portia. But I should think of shallows and of flats, To kiss her burial. Scene 1 The play opens with Antonio expressing feelings of depression that he is unable to explain. They lose it that do buy it with much care. Lancelet brings Lorenzo Jessica’s letter…. I’ll tell thee more of this another time; Come, good Lorenzo. Because you are not sad. And not bethink me straight of dangerous rocks. I pray you have in mind where we must meet. Therefore my merchandise makes me not sad. All's Well That Ends Well Antony & Cleopatra As You Like It Comedy of Errors Coriolanus Cymbeline Double Falsehood Edward 3 Hamlet Henry 4.1 Henry 4.2 Henry 5 Henry 6.1 Henry 6.2 Henry 6.3 Henry 8 Julius Caesar King John King Lear King Richard 2 Love's Labour's Lost Macbeth Measure for Measure Merchant of Venice Merry Wives of Windsor Midsummer Night's Dream Much Ado About Nothing … Start studying The Merchant of Venice Act 1. Thou know’st that all my fortunes are at sea; To raise a present sum. Antonio, a merchant, is in a melancholic state of mind and unable to find a reason for his depression. Shakespeare has portrayed Antonio and Bassanio’s relationship in a beautiful manner. But Antonio insists that he's confident his ships are safe. Must it be so? Good signiors both, when shall we laugh? Antonio is a sad bunny, though he claims he doesn't know why. By something showing a more swelling port. I pray you, good Bassanio, let me know it. That shall be rack’d, even to the uttermost. Lancelet’s father comes in search of…, Jessica, Shylock’s daughter, says good-bye to Lancelet and gives him a letter for Lorenzo, a friend of Bassanio. Nor is the wide world ignorant of her worth, For the four winds blow in from every coast. Believe me, sir, had I such venture forth, Be with my hopes abroad. Good signiors both, when shall we laugh? Merchant of Venice: Act 1, Scene 3 - YouTube. ACT 1. Bassanio, his friend and kinsman, asks him for…. Chapter; Aa; Aa; Get access. Antonio agrees, but points out that he has no cash at present, as all his money has been invested in sea ventures that have not yet returned; but his credit is good enough that he believes he will be able to raise the sum. SCENE 1. Piring in maps for ports and piers and roads; What harm a wind too great might do at sea. Chapter. Thanks, i’ faith, for silence is only commendable. Than my heart cool with mortifying groans. What stuff ’tis made of, whereof it is born, There where your argosies with portly sail. If worthier friends had not prevented me. Antonio, however, denies that he’s worried about his ships and remains depressed. Antonio gives Bassanio permission to borrow the money on Antonio’s credit. (i) This scene takes place in a street in Venice. And she is fair, and, fairer than that word, Of wondrous virtues. This page contains the original text of Act 1, Scene 1 of The Merchant of Venice: Enter ANTONIO, SALARINO, and SALANIO. Than my faint means would grant continuance. I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano. Year Published: 1597 Language: English Country of Origin: England Source: Shakespeare, W. (1597). As they fly by them with their woven wings.

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